One Common Teaching Method That Teachers Ignore

A lot of people have the stereotype that in language classes, children need more props and TPR, while adults need more white board notes to help them understand. However, the truth is that adults also love TPR and props.

In this video, Teacher Chris will analyze the characteristics of different levels of adult clients and provide teaching tips and examples of using TPR and props based on each level.

 

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Christopher LyttleKaren SelickGregory Fallis Recent comment authors
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Gregory Fallis
Consultant
Gregory Fallis

Chris, great video. I keep about $100 in twenties at my desk for a money prop. When I fan the 20s everyone ooos and aaahs.
Everyone loves seeing all the money! The luggage tag is great – better than just a picture.

Christopher Lyttle
Consultant
Christopher Lyttle

Great Idea! 😀

Karen Selick
Consultant
Karen Selick

Chris, you are clearly a good teacher. I just have an objection to the labelling of gestures as some new-tangled invention called “TPR”. People have communicated with others via gestures since time immemorial. Gestures and pictures are nothing new. TPR stands for “total physical response” and it doesn’t really describe gestures very well. I think the concept of TPR was intended to get the STUDENTS moving, not the teacher. The author of the book “The Brain that Changes Itself” uses this phrase: “The neurons that fire together wire together.” So when kids perform a physical motion with particular words, and… Read more »

Christopher Lyttle
Consultant
Christopher Lyttle

Thanks for the Tip Karen, I certainly agree the goal is to get the students moving! our TPR can be a powerful tool to help the students learn.