Dogs, Dog’s or Dogs’?

Could you explain the difference between dogs, dog´s and dogs´ to your students if they asked you?…..

Here, I will be showing you the difference between the three and will give you 5 tips on how to actually teach this in your lessons.

In fancy talk, this is called the ´Possessive Case of Noun Rule….´

¨The Possessive Case of Nouns: What on earth are those?¨ I hear you say.

Possessive case of nouns show ownership of something. In other words, when we add ´S or just an ´ onto a word.

Explanation:

Ok, but how can I teach that to my students? (Or is it students´?)

 

Idea 1:

For young children, you can use a puppet. Show the student that the puppet owns something. Then you can write the sentence on the white board. If you have several puppets, you can show this with the plural form too.

e.g. Mickey´s hat.

       The puppets´ pens.

       Mickey and Minnie´s pencil.

 

Idea 2

You can also do this by putting pictures of people they know (for example Spiderman, the Queen, Donald Trump etc) and then labeling what belongs to them. There are pictures of these people in the stock pictures file. Again, this can also be done with plural group of people to show the difference.

e.g. The Queen´s crown.

        Donald Trump´s shirt.

        The doctors´ pens.

 

 Idea 3

Write sentences on the whiteboard with gaps so the student has to fill in the correct answer.

Idea 4

Write some sentences on the whiteboard and get the student to draw a happy face next to it if it is correct, or a sad face next to it if it is incorrect.

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Lana Murphy
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Lana Murphy

I really like this, it shows an easy and effective way of teaching punctuation. Thank you.

Karen Selick
Consultant
Karen Selick

I agree that even native English speakers often get this wrong. Too bad North American schools don’t bother teaching this stuff any more. Fortunately, our computers and phones often correct us, and they are getting it right more and more often.

Silke
Consultant
Silke

I find it really sad that they don’t teach these things properly anymore. The same goes for adverbs in British English. A lot of kids today follow the “lazy” American example these days, saying, e.g. bad instead of badly, or quick instead of quickly. And you are right, many British people also don’t know their apostrophe’s from th’eir b’ums. 😉

Mony
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Mony

Wow easy and simple, thanks for this!

Phil Zurita
Consultant
Phil Zurita

This is very interesting content. Will help a lot!

Cesar
Consultant
Cesar

Thanks for sharing!

Nikola Sipic
Consultant
Nikola Sipic

It’s simple as that, visual cues are key when teaching young learners.

Maddy H
Consultant
Maddy H

Simple, clear and practical. I’ve used these points myself. Thank you.

Greta T
Consultant
Greta T

Back to basics. It’s important to review these rules every once in a while. Thank you for the reminder!